December 10, 2019

Our bones are living tissue. There is a constant process of remodelling that involves laying down new bone and the breaking down of old. When they breaking down of bone begins to outweigh the laying down of new, our bones begin to become a bit softer and more brittle. This is a very basic summation of the disease called osteoporosis.

There are certain things that predispose us to the development of this condition which include a family history, dietary factors, medical history and exposure to certain drugs as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking and low levels of physical activity.

As we get older the delicate balance of bone remodelling begins to skew in the way of increased bone resorption (bone loss). This is when dietary and lifestyle factors become of high importance to ensure good bone health and the avoidance of any bone insufficiency related issues.

An important thing to address is diet. Ensuring that you are eating a well balanced diet that has sufficient levels of important vitamins and minerals such as vitamin D and Calcium. Consulting with a Dietitian to discuss safe and practical implementation of important nutrients into your regular diet is advised in those who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis or who have an accumulation of risk factors as mentioned previously.

Another crucial aspect to improving or maintaining good bone health is physical activity. In particular, axial loading of bones has been shown to stimulate bone growth. This occurs during weight bearing or loaded exercise. Bone responds to this load much the same way as muscles, ligaments and tendons – by becoming stronger. There are many options when it comes to exercise – finding something that you enjoy is a good way to ensure that exercise becomes a sustainable endeavour. Aerobic exercises such as walking, dancing and jogging all load our bones to some extent. Resistance training is also an excellent way to load our bones whilst also improving muscle strength and improving function. Implementing these exercises in a progressive and safe manner is of vital importance. Talking to a healthcare professional about a tailored exercise program with appropriate exercises is the best place to start.

In summary, if you are at risk of low bone health there are many avenues to improving. Two of the easiest things to address are improving specific nutrient density in your diet by talking to our OHL Dietitian as well as increasing your amount of weight bearing physical activity in consultation with your OHL Physiotherapist. So eat well and exercise more!





More Optimal Tips

Hip Bursitis - Why cortisone is not enough?!
Hip Bursitis - Why cortisone is not enough?!

April 12, 2024

"Your hip imaging report shows greater trochanteric bursitis, so I recommend you have a cortisone injection and see a physiotherapist to assess the situation more, understand your individual factors and build you a successful rehabilitation program” - this is the conversation we hope happens for all clients who have been diagnosed with hip bursitis. Check out this Optimal Tip to read why the injection is not enough as a standalone treatment plan.   

Continue Reading

In the Saddle: Unveiling Physiotherapists' Perspectives on the Therapeutic Marvels of Bike Riding
In the Saddle: Unveiling Physiotherapists' Perspectives on the Therapeutic Marvels of Bike Riding

December 05, 2023

There are many advantages of incorporating bike riding into your exercise regime. Physiotherapists recognise its therapeutic impact on joint health, emphasising range of motion and lubrication of the lower limb joints through low-impact motion. Bike riding is also a strength-building activity that engages major muscle groups and contributes to cardiovascular fitness. Additionally, the social and mental well-being aspects of cycling are highlighted, underscoring its role as a versatile and strategic tool in the physiotherapist's toolkit for a holistic approach to well-being.

Continue Reading

Bowled over by a shoulder injury? Here’s how you can restore your bowling performance to its pre-injury level.
Bowled over by a shoulder injury? Here’s how you can restore your bowling performance to its pre-injury level.

December 05, 2023

“When can I throw again?” is one of the most common questions asked by any overhead athlete post a shoulder injury or surgery. The answer to this question is multifaceted, as it depends on the timeframe from the injury, certain subjective and objective measures, as well as the athlete’s willingness. However, the simple answer is when the athlete is fully ready, and not before. This blog will highlight the prerequisites and the process of progressive return to bowling for cricketers after they’ve injured their shoulder.

Continue Reading