August 08, 2019

A concussion is defined as a mild traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions. The effects of concussion are usually temporary but can include altered levels of consciousness, headaches, confusion, dizziness, memory loss of events surrounding the injury and visual disturbance.

 

Concussion is getting a lot of press in regard to professional sportspeople but is now hugely talked about in all levels of sport and more and more in everyday life. People often bump or bang their heads and it can be difficult to tell whether an injury is serious or not, so we've summarised information to help you best assess the situation before seeking any additional help. 

 

The SCAT-5 is a diagnostic tool for concussion but is only to be administered by a medical professional, so our best recommendation is to download an app called HeadCheck. HeadCheck helps you best assess the symptoms and signs related to a concussion and directs you to the ideal contact point, dependent on severity. 

Below is a list of key take-home messages from both these evidence-based assessment tools, combined with our experience as Physiotherapists. 

1. Any person with suspected concussion should be removed from activity, medically assessed and monitored for deterioration. No athlete diagnosed with concussion should be returned to play on the day of injury. If a person is suspected of having a concussion, and medical personnel aren't immediately available, they should be referred to the local doctor or emergency department. 

2. Concussion signs and symptoms evolve over time and it's important to consider repeat evaluation (using the HeadCheck app) in the assessment of concussion.

3. The diagnosis of a concussion is a clinical judgement make by a medical doctor, not a physiotherapist, any other allied health professional or a parent. 

4. There isn't evidence to prove that a helmet reduces the severity of a concussion when playing sport. 

5. You don't need to have lost consciousness to experience a concussion.

6. Concussion symptoms can take up to four weeks to go away, sometimes even longer. Children typically take longer to recover from a concussion than adults. 

 

If you need more information regarding concussion, head over to https://www.headcheck.com.au





More Optimal Tips

What is Urinary Incontinence? World Continence Week: 15-22 June 2020
What is Urinary Incontinence? World Continence Week: 15-22 June 2020

June 19, 2020

Did you know that incontinence is one of the leading reasons for Australian seniors being admitted to residential aged care? But incontinence isn’t just an issue for older women. 1 in 3 women will experience urinary incontinence after childbirth.  This week aims to raise awareness of the issue for all women and encourage them to seek assistance.

Continue Reading

Osteoarthritis bothering you? Have you considered the wins of water physio?
Osteoarthritis bothering you? Have you considered the wins of water physio?

June 05, 2020

Physiotherapist Kirsty Tindal explains exactly what hydrotherapy is and how it can be a great option in the management of osteoarthritis. Read on to hear about all the benefits of warm water for your pain rlief and exercise goals!

Continue Reading

More than just ‘leg day’: learn more about the science behind achieving strength and control after your ACL Reco
More than just ‘leg day’: learn more about the science behind achieving strength and control after your ACL Reco

June 05, 2020

Stage 2 of ACL rehabilitation is the strength and control phase. This is where the fun really begins. Your knee is no longer sore, swollen and cranky, you’re walking around more normally and feeling a bit more confident with your newly reconstructed knee. Now is the time where we start to load you and restore your strength and control. But how do you know where to start or what to do?

Continue Reading